Aging and dental health

It’s a fact, Americans are aging.  The demographics for Americans age 65 years of age and older is the fastest growing segment of our population.   Although better than in years past, the typical aging adult baseline health state can be complicated by comorbid conditions (e.g., diabetes mellitus, hypertension) and physiologic changes associated with aging.  On average, older adults more regularly use prescription and /or over-the-counter medications, making them more vulnerable to medication errors, drug interactions or adverse drug reactions.  All of which, when combined with some of the potential physical, sensory, and cognitive impairments associated with aging, work together to make oral health care even more important and sometimes even more challenging.

In addition to regular dental visits, it’s a good idea for older adults to brush their teeth two or more times daily; use of an electric or battery-operated toothbrush should be considered.  The same oral care routine should be followed consistently, as possible.  In case of removable oral prosthetic devices, the device(s) should be removed, inspected, and cleaned before bed and returned to the mouth in the morning.

If you’re an older adult or have an older adult that you help take care of, don’t put off seeing the dentist.  Call today to make an appointment and let’s get started on the road to better oral care and better health.

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